Our Stories

Farmer Story 1
Compared to its neighbours, Nepal is a relatively small country in South Asia. Nepal represents incredible mixture of cultures and religions living side by side in perfect harmony. Nepal also offers a wide range of nature from the hot and humid equatorial jungle, home of wild rhinos, elephants and tigers to the impressive Himalayan mountains on the northern border. Another part of Nepal's landscape is the hilly region of rich vegetation and green hills covered with tea plantations. The growing conditions in the hilly region (as the locals familiarly call it) of eastern Nepal are essentially identical to those of famous Darjeeling region in West Bengal, which lies in India (roughly 30 miles away). Rainfall is plentiful and the heat of summer days is tempered by cool nights. Although Nepali tea has not yet achieved the same recognition and tradition as that of Darjeeling tea, things are looking up. As the tea zone of Nepal spreads to the west and the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) is becoming increasingly popular to grow, the farmers hope the demand for tea will rise. This is a development which is welcomed as it will enable them to feed their families and establish new plantations to ensure a continuation of the business. In India, hopes are unfortunately not as high.
Compared to its neighbours, Nepal is a relatively small country in South Asia. Nepal represents incredible mixture of cultures and religions living side by side in perfect harmony. Nepal also offers a wide range of nature from the hot and humid equatorial jungle, home of wild rhinos, elephants and tigers to the impressive Himalayan mountains on the northern border. Another part of Nepal's landscape is the hilly region of rich vegetation and green hills covered with tea plantations. The growing conditions in the hilly region (as the locals familiarly call it) of eastern Nepal are essentially identical to those of famous Darjeeling region in West Bengal, which lies in India (roughly 30 miles away). Rainfall is plentiful and the heat of summer days is tempered by cool nights. Although Nepali tea has not yet achieved the same recognition and tradition as that of Darjeeling tea, things are looking up. As the tea zone of Nepal spreads to the west and the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) is becoming increasingly popular to grow, the farmers hope the demand for tea will rise. This is a development which is welcomed as it will enable them to feed their families and establish new plantations to ensure a continuation of the business. In India, hopes are unfortunately not as high.